RAiSE-ing Our Voice – Jessie

RAiISE-ing Our Voice is a series of blog posts in which we provide a platform for young people to share their stories and speak up about issues they face whilst living with an invisible illness. 

Hi my name is Jessie and I am 21 years old. I have struggled with my mental health from the age of 14 and have battled with depression and anxiety for years.

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RAiISE-ing Our Voice – Siena

RAiISE-ing Our Voice is a series of blog posts in which we provide a platform for young people to share their stories and speak up about issues they face whilst living with an invisible illness. 

Society still has a long way to go before the needs of people with invisible disabilities are recognised and met. Recently, there has been a lot of public ridicule and criticism about the University of Manchester’s Students Union’s decision to ban clapping and cheering. One journalist, referred to the decision as “bonkers” and as yet another ridiculous example of the snowflake generation’s emotional fragility and lack of resilience.

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RAiISE-ing Our Voice – Niamh

RAiISE-ing Our Voice is a series of blog posts in which we provide a platform for young people to share their stories and speak up about issues they face whilst living with an invisible illness. 

Growing up with JIA – Niamh Costello, Ireland

My name is Niamh Costello, I am 19 years old and I have had Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis since I was 3 years old. It only seems like yesterday when I crawled into my parent’s bedroom on my hands and knees. I was screaming in agony and I could not walk. I was this tiny frail body with a huge swollen knee that had been bothering me for weeks now.

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World Lupus Day 2018

Sammy is the mum of RAiISE Founder Sophie. On this World Lupus Day, she shares her experience of being a parent of child with Lupus.

Lupus crept into our family so slowly that at first, initially it was hard to notice as small changes trickled into my daughters’ life. At first the odd strange pain in her shoulder, knee or back was put down to her being tired, overdoing it, or even that she had somehow strained something. Within a couple of weeks her symptoms had got worse and so we went off to the GP hoping for a bit of reassurance. At this time as a mum, I was concerned but not worrying unduly as all of her symptoms could be put down to something that we believed could be explained. Ironically after seeing the GP I was actually more worried, he tried to put breathing problems and all the other things that were starting to affect her everyday life down to a phase, her age and even suggested she would grow out of them. As a mum you know when something is wrong and as she had never had any major health concerns apart from the usual childhood illnesses I began to worry that he was totally getting it wrong.

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